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United Nations Postal Service 2003 Issue
Design by Joseph Hautman, James Hautman, and Robert Hautman

The United Nations Postal Service has issued twelve new stamp that have postage values of 37 cents, 0,51 Euro and 0,90 F.s. named "Endangered Species" on the 3rd of April 2003. The stamps depict twelve endangered species of fauna. This will be the eleventh set of stamps in UNPA's multi-year series Endangered Species, which began on March 3, 1993 to inform the world of the need to protect certain species of animals from extinction.

The Great Hornbill can be found in south-west India eastwards to Myanmar and south China, and southwards to the Malaysian Peninsula and Sumatra. It can be found in large forests and occasionally it ventures out into open areas, but mainly with the intention to move to the next patch of forests. Currently the great hormbill in not threatened globally, but is declining because several forests are being destroyed. It is further threatened by the selective cutting of large nesting trees which reduces their habitat areas. They are listed in Appendix I of the Endangered Species list.

The Scarlet Ibis can be found from north and east Colombia and east Ecuador to north Venezuela, the Guiana region and coastal Brazil as far as the delta of the Amazon River. They were mainly threaten because of the demand of their colorful feathers. They are listed in Appendix II of the Endangered Species list.

The Knob-billed Goose can be found in Africa south of the Sahara to tropical Asia and South America. It lives in swamps, lakes or rivers in areas with thinly scattered trees, but can also be found in more open grassland. It is not globally threatened and has a healthy population in Africa. The South American subspecies is less common, with some good populations of 250 specimens or more only in some parts of Venezuela. They are listed in Appendix II of the Endangered Species list.

The White-faced Whistling Duck can be found in Africa south of the Sahara and in South America. It lives in a wide variety of habitats, including artificial ones, but has a preference for freshwater in open country. Its movements are determined by the availability of water, but the white-faced Whistling Duck never travels more than a few hundred kilometers. It is not globally threatened but has been included by Ghana in Appendix III of the Endangered Species list.

The Red-breasted Geese can be found in the Taimyr Peninsula in the Russian Arctic and around the Black Sea in Romania, Bulgaria and Ukraine. In the summer they live in dry shrub and lichen-covered areas not far from water; and in the winter they occupy pastures and crop fields near shallow waters. They are still recognized as globally threatened despite the fact that the world population numbers over 100,000 birds. This is because most of the population is concentrated during winter at fewer than ten locations and at only five roosts. The species is listed in Appendix II of the Endangered Species list.

The Bald Ibis can be found in restricted areas in the highlands of the Transvaal, Lesotho and Swaziland. They live in high-altitude grassland (between 1,200 and 1,850 meters high), where it feeds in grass that is not higher than its belly. Its population is fully protected and remains stable at around 5,000-8,000. The species has been listed in Appendix II of the Endangered Species list since 1975.

The Fulvous Whistling Duck can be found in the southern United States to Northern and Eastern South America, down to northern Argentina. It can also be found in parts of Africa and Asia. It lives in a wide variety of habitats and has a preference for freshwater in open country. It will basically stay in one place and will only move when the water availability demands it. The species is not globally threatened but has been declared by Ghana and Honduras in Appendix III of the Endangered Species list.

The Channel-billed Toucans can be found in eastern Venezuela to Guyana and eastern Brazil. They live in rainforests up to 1,100 meters high, and are frequently found close to water. There are five subspecies, which can be distinguished on the basis of their coloration and geographic distributions in South America. They usually live in small bands, foraging in higher branches and treetops of tall trees. They are not globally threatened, but may become so due to the destruction of large trees which is their normal habitat. The Channel-billed Toucans is listed in Appendix II of the Endangered Species list.

The Baikal Teal can be found in Siberia, Korea, Japan, Mongolia and eastern China. They live in rivers, small ponds, marshes and lakes in well-wooded country or in the Arctic tundra. They feed on seeds of moist soil plants, rice aquatic invertebrates and small fish found in shallow water. The species is considered vulnerable and is listed in Appendix II of the Endangered Species list.

The Hadada Ibis can be found in sub-Saharan Africa, except in the drier areas of eastern Somalia and the south-west of the continent. Its lives in wooded streams, swamps, marshes, flooded areas, edges of lakes, pastures and rivers with treed banks. The species is not globally threatened and is thriving in Africa. It was listed in Appendix III of the Endangered Species by Ghana because this country intended to protect its entire fauna.

The Toco Toucan is found throughout Eastern South America, from the Guiana region through Brazil to northern Argentina. This species habitat is usually on the canopy of the tropical rainforests. It is not considered to be endangered but its habitat is being destroyed by logging operation which may become a problem in the future. It is listed in Appendix II of the Endangered Species list.

The Egyptian Goose is found throughout Africa, south of the Sahara and in the Nile Valley. It was introduced in Western Europe, where well-established populations occurred. They live in wetlands and in open areas in pairs or family groups. These geese are very aggressive and are intolerant of other birds including their own kind. They are listed in Appendix III of the Endangered Species list by Ghana largely because the country wanted to protect its entire fauna.

The Endangered Species stamps can be purchased in three different sheets of 16, Se-Tenant blocks of 4, or various FDC. The stamp size measures 39.2 mm x 28.6 mm and will have a perforation size of 12 1/2 x 12 3/4. The stamps will be printed by Joh. Enschede Stamps Security Printers B.V., Netherlands using the Offset Lithography printing process. The quantity printed will be 91,000 sheets of the 37 cents, 92,000 sheets of the F.s. 0,90 and 108,000 sheets of the 0,51 Euro.

To order these stamps or to learn more go to http://www.un.org/Depts/UNPA. Use the Universal currency conversion tool at www.xe.com/ucc/convert.cgi to convert currency.

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